Archive for the ‘STANDARD 3 UTILIZATION’ Category

My last project for Multimedia EDTECH 513 was to create a worked example, which is a multimedia instruction video.  As I thought about what to create, I kept in mind that I wanted a lesson that I commonly use with my fifth grade students.  Since we became a Google district, I have been encouraging collaboration using the Google Apps.  The most commonly used app is Google Docs.  My students easily get the hang of typing their information because they have had instruction with Microsoft Word in the past.  Sharing documents and saving work is a skill that they commonly have questions about.  With Google Docs it is easy to share and collaborate with partners or groups and the work always saves automatically.  My students constantly need a lesson in the beginning of the year to learn the steps to complete this process.  They usually ask me a few times to review those same steps.  A video on my website demonstrating these steps will help with time management in my classroom because I will not have to reteach the same lessons to students who need new or repetitive instruction.  The students can view a lesson on Google Docs sharing for the initial introduction to the skill with practice, as well as a refresher if any steps were forgotten.  Therefore, I created a worked example demonstrating Google Docs Sharing.

To create this worked example, I had to find screen-recording software that was easy to use for beginners.  I have QuickTime for MAC but I found editing a bit cumbersome.  I downloaded the free trial of Camtasia and was fortunate to find that there were excellent tutorials included with the software.  I watched a few and can’t wait to practice more, but for now I kept it simple.  I used their suggestion and wrote out a script outline for the lesson.  I practiced a few times to learn how to import a title slide, do a voiceover, delete video, and edit any mistakes.  Once I felt comfortable, I created the tutorial in two recordings due to an error towards the middle of my recording.  Basically, I stumbled on the wording and forgot what I was doing.  After I was done, I put the title, title audio and two recordings together to make my worked example and uploaded it to YouTube.  I was sure to keep this week’s reading about conceptually meaningful chunks in mind while recording.  It states that if a procedure has many steps to perform, the lesson should be grouped into skills that build on each other (Clark and Mayer, 2008). To do this, I grouped specific skills and had the students pause the video and practice these skills throughout the lesson to avoid cognitive overload and encourage learning transfer.  Pausing the video allows students to work at their own pace and move forward when they are comfortable completing the next set of skills.  The biggest challenge I faced with recording was finding a quiet space, away from my three sons, ringing phones, computer notifications, and a barking dog.  Aside from that, I found the experience enjoyable and creating worked example videos is something I will continue to do in the future to help my students and train teachers during professional developments that I deliver.  This way all lessons can be revisited if the need arises.  I hope this video tutorial not only helps my students but can also aid teachers of elementary school age children.

Clark, R. C.  & Mayer, R. E. (2008). E-learning and the science of instruction. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

Google Docs Sharing Tutorial Narration

 

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Here is the link to the paper I wrote on the Coherence Principle.  Enjoy and feel free to comment.

The Coherence Analysis

Talking EdTech with Trish Podcast link

Podcast Transcript

The podcast series I would create would be a weekly podcast on all different topics about Educational Technology. This week I chose to share as much information about electronic portfolio use in the classroom as I could without overwhelming you. In fact, if anything, I believe I tried to persuade you to think favorably, since electronic portfolios are becoming more and more in demand in school districts. This task was timely because not long ago I was asked by my school district to give a professional development on portfolio use. I was to come up with a plan for a school-wide portfolio assessment program and I really wasn’t confident that I could accomplish it effectively. I studied and reviewed the areas that were hazy to me and as I presented details to you about the digital portfolios, I became reinvested in the practice once again.  As a teacher, I recognize so much potential for the students and fulfillment for the teachers with digital portfolio use.

So now you know my intentions, but here are some of the real comings and goings during this project. I sincerely hope you felt my favorable vibes within the context of my presentation.  The actual preparation of the Podcast was more stressful.  The acoustics weren’t accurate at first, and when that issue was conquered, I jumbled my verbal presentation.  I was feeling very confident at one point, somewhere around providing you with the benefits of student portfolios, when my youngest son barged into the room during recording and I had to start over again. I have three sons, so this interruption was not too bad.  All in all, when I look back at my work, I am proud of the contents.  I am anxious to read what you think and, please tell me, did I sway your opinion of digital portfolio use at all?

 

Haiku DeckThis week, in my EDTECH 513 Multimedia class, we learned that when designing a presentation, it is important to incorporate the Modality Principle. This means that learning occurs through the use of images where only a small amount of text is presented with the narration. For this project, we were asked to use Haiku Deck, which is a website that helps the user create powerful presentations that promote teaching and learning. When I created my account, I experimented with Haiku Deck’s features and I was impressed with how easy it was to navigate and create a presentation with beautiful images and speaker notes.

The presentation I chose to create is titled, Google Edu. My school system just adopted the use of Google Apps for all our students and faculty. At first there was a bit of skepticism on how successful this would be, so I decided to get some training and become a Certified Google Educator. I was able to decide for myself how effective Google Edu is and I would also be able pass on what I learned to my fellow colleagues through Professional Development. After my training, I fell in love with all the Google Apps. I did some PD events but I am still in need of a presentation tool to convince my fellow educators on how cool the Google Apps are and how they can be incorporated into their lesson plans. This presentation will accompany my discussion of an Introduction to the Google Apps. The speaker notes give an outline about what my narration would consist of but I would go into more detail about examples of my use of Google Apps in my classroom.

Here is the link to my presentation: Google Edu

Hi Everyone,

Feel free to view my Technology Use Plan created for my graduate studies at Boise State University for EDTECH 501. This presentation provides an overview of a the process of creating a district wide Technology Use Plan along with examples of each step.

 

I created a Technology Needs Assessment example discussed in the Technology Use Plan presentation. This assessment a necessary step to be taken by school districts in order to evaluate the success of the District Technology Plan.
Thank you!

Throughout history, we learned that for instructional technology to succeed, on-going collaboration is required among national, state, and local educational organizations. Many technological advancements have been created, such as, CAI applications, audiovisual libraries, microcomputer drill and practice programs, etc., to hopefully benefit our educational techniques and student progress. These were dismissed or fizzled out faster than they could be properly implemented. Most failed due to lack of teacher enthusiasm and proven educational need. This history is unacceptable for our students.

The US military’s proven success of using technology for a teaching medium is a model for successful technology integration on state and national levels. According to Reiser, (2001) military trainers expressed satisfaction with training films utilized during World War 1. The military defined the immediate crisis, and after the proper collaboration, used the appropriate technology to solve the problem.

I propose that our educational system should take this same approach. Our National Educational Technology Standards(Nets) focuses on infusion of technology in order to create, problem solve, and collaborate. Our state standards focus upon this same need. Our local administrators’ goal is to raise student test scores in order to comply with state accountability. Further collaboration is beneficial to define the exact goal of the state and require implementation by local districts of appropriate technology encouraging that specific goal. For example, integrating technology for global communication, real world problem solving, and creation and expression will naturally allow students to think and express themselves and enhance their performance on standardized testing. It would be far better to define our goals as educators and work together toward its achievement, such as the military demonstrated to us in my previous example. Change is needed; however, unity in our goal is the determining factor for success.

Reiser, R.A. (2001). A History of Instructional Design and Technology: Part I: A History of Instructional Media. Educational Technology Research and Development, 49 (1), 53-64.


“Listen up class! Open your textbook to Chapter 5. Outline the chapter and be sure to pay attention to all important dates. We will be having a on quiz this chapter on Wednesday”. All I could hear from my classmates were groans of torture. This is my memory of history classes during my early education. Fortunately for today’s students, history does not just consist of memorizing rote facts and mindless reading of boring textbooks. Technology and the Internet created the ability to make history “come alive” for our students by creating thought-provoking, reflective and exciting experiences to uncover and investigate. The NCSS (1994) stated, “the primary purpose of social studies is to help young people develop the ability to make informed and reasoned decisions for the public good as citizens of a culturally diverse, democratic society in an interdependent world”. This vision cannot be accomplished simply through memorization of facts and lecture style teaching. Technology provides students with access to our ever-changing world and gives them the opportunity to discuss world issues globally or use critical thinking skills through world simulations and primary source documents.

This week I have been asked to prepare a history lesson for my students using primary source documents. These can consist of diaries, letters, poems, and newspapers. Other sources can be artifacts, paintings, audio/video, and music. (Heritage Community Foundation, 2002) While sifting through the many recommended websites, I was astounded by all of the interesting pieces of history I stumbled upon that I did not even realize existed. I found it difficult to concentrate on my needed research since I could not stop exploring the fascinating information on my screen. Eye Witness to History gives history accounts directly from the person who lived it. I read the newspaper article printed in 1812 about the sinking of the Titanic, viewed photographs from the great depression and listened to a reporter discuss the news of D-day 1944. This is all from one website.

Colonial Williamsburg had a very informative website depicting colonial times. There, I found information needed for my weather unit. I never knew how the weather was predicted long ago, and this site provided me with an accurate analysis of what people relied upon before the National Weather Service was created. I realize I take certain things for granted after visiting this site. I was able to find maps of the colonies from early America and compare them to America today, all on one computer screen.

My favorite history moment using technology was stumbling upon world simulations. Children are now able to assume the role as a character from history, and make decisions using historical information. They are then able to see first hand what their decisions will do to the outcome of today. PBS.org’s Colonial House allows students to be Governor of a New World Colony of Mayne. Using this site, students journey safely across the sea with their selected colonists. They are scored on their decision making skills. I highly suggest giving this a try.

With state testing demands and pressure about student test scores, many districts tend to put social studies/history classes on hold. Students are asked to concentrate on math, science and language arts in preparation for these exams. I believe this does our children a huge disservice. They are our country’s future leaders! Engaging and thought provoking history lessons enable our children to understand society, empathize with others, think globally, make good decisions using problem solving skills, analyze past events to prepare for the future, and most importantly, encourage good citizenship. If our students learn with these engaging technologies and global communication problem based learning methods, I believe our students will be more prepared for the required thinking for desired test scores, but more importantly, they will be capable and confident to succeed as leaders in this ever-changing global society. Technology and history not only make lessons fascinating, they prepare our children for the demands of tomorrow.

Heritage Community Foundation. (2002). Primary Source Overview. Retrieved April 12, 2010, from Heritage Community Foundation Presents Alberta Online Encyclopedia:
http://www.youthsource.ab.ca/teacher_resources/ps_overview.html

NCSS. (1994). Curriculum Standards for Social Studies: I. Introduction. Retrieved April 10, 2010, from National Council for the Social Studies:
http://www.socialstudies.org/standards/introduction

Technology plays a vital role in today’s educational curriculum. The effective use of technology provides the ability to inspire, prepare, and improve learning of students of all ages. Some of the most basic daily lesson plans can become much more powerful and inspirational to a learner simply by changing the direction of how the lesson is delivered. Technology integration changes a student’s perception and increases student motivation. Although there are many local funding and teacher training hurdles to overcome, research confirms the overall conclusion that technology used in education produces positive and meaningful results.

Test Scores Improve

Students with access to computers are able to utilize programs and technology resources to make a difference in their personal goals and test scores. Teachers can pinpoint, through the use of testing software, areas of strengths and weaknesses for each student. Teachers can also obtain data and feedback on specific lessons and activities needed to improve individual learning. Research shows that schools who do not reach the AYP requirements are behind in technological advances and usage within their district. Those who have access to technology are motivated and engaged in daily lesson performance, thus decreasing student dropout and failure. A study done in Missouri showed that fourth graders improved consistently on their the MAP results when their classrooms were equipped with technology, basic productivity software, and high speed internet connections.(Bickford, 2005)

Technology Prepares Students for Real Word Life Skills

In the 21st century, students require lifelong learning skills and preparation for the future where they will be expected to put these skills to work. The use of technology by students and teachers provides more collaborative working time and team problem solving, something that will benefit them in all aspects of life. Students trained to use distance learning and web communications to dialog with schools and community groups all over the world gain a wide variety of perspectives. Students retain and understand lessons when information presented is relevant and meaningful to their life’s experiences. A hands-on method of working together provides students with a more significant and real world application to their curriculum. (Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2003)

Technology Prepares Students for the Workforce

In today’s global economy students must have access to the most relevant computer resources available in order to be a competitive member of the world’s workforce. Technology based curriculum prepares students to enter colleges and universities and to be productive members of the workforce environment. Career Pathway districts integrated technology with learning and career exploration. High school students reported a sense of accomplishment and pride in their work and felt they possessed the appropriate tools and methods needed to enter today’s careers. Teachers and administrators felt they were a positive element of this process and were motivated to continue improving their instructional practices. Student’s grade point averages were higher and graduation statistics rose, with technology trained students expressing more confidence in their future. (Career Pathways in Michigan Schools, 2002)

In order for our future generation to be educated and prepared for today’s workforce environment, it is imperative to incorporate technology into all facets of our curriculum. Today’s society places high demands on the use of computers, multimedia and appropriate technological problem solving in order to be successful in the 21st Century. It is imperative that teachers and students be technologically literate in this generation. To accomplish this, technology must be a part of a student’s everyday learning. This enables all types of knowledge including, visual, auditory, kinesthetic and critical thinking. Student learning and achievement has a more direct positive result when technology is used on a regular basis. The ISTE mandates many standards for both students and teachers to ensure the proper learning environment for our students. Their focus is not only on the use of technology, but rather on the endless possibilities of the learning journey when technology is used correctly. “Taking the journey is critical in preparing students to live, learn, and work in a technology-rich world. “ (ISTE,2010) Let’s prepare our students today for this lifelong journey ahead.

Bickford, Adam. “Analysis of 2004 MAP Results for eMINTS Students.” Evaluation Team Policy Brief, eMINTS National Center, January 10, 2005. Retrieved from
http://www.emints.org/evaluation/reports/map2004.pdf

Partnership for 21st Century Skills. (2003, June). Learning for the 21st Century: A Report and MILE Guide for 21st Century Skills. Retrieved from
http://www.21stcenturyskills.org/downloads/P21_Report.pdf

“Career Pathways in Michigan Schools: A Success Story.” Michigan Department of Career Development. December 2002. Retrieved from
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/A_Success_Stor_Black_white_60632_7.pdf

International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), Resources for Educational Technology Professionals, 2010 Retrieved from
http://www.iste.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Educator_Resources