Archive for the ‘STANDARD 2 DEVELOPMENT’ Category

Multimedia & Contiguity Principles Design Notes

This week, I created a Clarify Presentation demonstrating the procedures for creating a digital story using Storyjumper.

The objective is: Given access to storyjumper.com, students will be able to follow procedures in order to create a digital storybook about cyberbullying.

Design notes:

  • Label each step with a title
  • Type “speaker note” style instructions, as if the instructor was speaking to the student.
  • Take screen shots of the storyjumper website that is needed for each step of the procedure.
  • Use minimal text to clarify the speaker notes and explain the graphic.
  • Explain the assessment at the end of the presentation.

I teach STEM in a computer lab; therefore, most of my instruction concentrates on technology procedures. The Multimedia and Contiguity Principle played an important role while designing my presentation.  The layout of the presentation keeps in mind how people learn and how cognitive overload can be an issue when using a great deal of text and graphics.  Consequently, I was certain to maintain graphics as screenshots of the actual procedures of using storyjumper.com.  This was done in order to correctly guide the learner through the process of digital storytelling.  I used transformational graphics that shows a series of steps to keep in mind the Multimedia Principle. The longer instructional text has a simple graphic with short text to simplify the directions.  Words and graphics are recommended for optimal learning. Each step contains only a minimal number of graphics to capture the learner’s attention with words in close proximity to the graphic in order to comply with the Contiguity Principle.  The viewers will gain a clear connection between text and graphic to successfully apply their learning.

Digital Storytelling Instruction Project
AECT standard 1.2 Message Design,

AECT standard 2.3 Computer-Based Technologies

 

Advertisements

This learning log serves as the home to my course in EDTECH 513 Multimedia.  I will post my reflections and artifacts as I journey through this semester.  I look forward to a great learning experience.  I welcome your comments, thoughts, and suggestions.

Creative Commons License
This work by Patricia Smeyers is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License.

Most educators often think of technology as a tool to be incorporated into math, science and language arts. I was amazed at how many useful resources are available for education of the arts. Using the arts across the curriculum gives students the ability to learn and express themselves using different forms of expression. This past week, I discovered many websites and softwares that enhance music, physical education, health and art. My first instinct was to write a long blog about all of these wonderful sites to visit that demonstrate how the arts can be incorporated across the curriculum while being enhanced by technology. Every time I attempted to type, I would get sidetracked playing with my new found website Eduglogster. I had an idea. Why not show you how I can create a visual representation of what I learned this week, while giving you a list of resources that I stumbled upon while researching websites for educators to use for teaching all areas within the arts? According to Surf Report: Integrating Art Across the Curriculum (Wisconsin Public Broadcasting, 2008), “Using art across the curriculum can be a way to engage visual learners, to launch collaborations between teachers, and to add new depth to subjects from social studies and language arts to math and science.” My resources, along with the many others I have discovered, will help all educators reach visual and auditory learners and and spark our children to express themselves with all of their educational successes.

http://edu.glogster.com//glog/7231837


“Listen up class! Open your textbook to Chapter 5. Outline the chapter and be sure to pay attention to all important dates. We will be having a on quiz this chapter on Wednesday”. All I could hear from my classmates were groans of torture. This is my memory of history classes during my early education. Fortunately for today’s students, history does not just consist of memorizing rote facts and mindless reading of boring textbooks. Technology and the Internet created the ability to make history “come alive” for our students by creating thought-provoking, reflective and exciting experiences to uncover and investigate. The NCSS (1994) stated, “the primary purpose of social studies is to help young people develop the ability to make informed and reasoned decisions for the public good as citizens of a culturally diverse, democratic society in an interdependent world”. This vision cannot be accomplished simply through memorization of facts and lecture style teaching. Technology provides students with access to our ever-changing world and gives them the opportunity to discuss world issues globally or use critical thinking skills through world simulations and primary source documents.

This week I have been asked to prepare a history lesson for my students using primary source documents. These can consist of diaries, letters, poems, and newspapers. Other sources can be artifacts, paintings, audio/video, and music. (Heritage Community Foundation, 2002) While sifting through the many recommended websites, I was astounded by all of the interesting pieces of history I stumbled upon that I did not even realize existed. I found it difficult to concentrate on my needed research since I could not stop exploring the fascinating information on my screen. Eye Witness to History gives history accounts directly from the person who lived it. I read the newspaper article printed in 1812 about the sinking of the Titanic, viewed photographs from the great depression and listened to a reporter discuss the news of D-day 1944. This is all from one website.

Colonial Williamsburg had a very informative website depicting colonial times. There, I found information needed for my weather unit. I never knew how the weather was predicted long ago, and this site provided me with an accurate analysis of what people relied upon before the National Weather Service was created. I realize I take certain things for granted after visiting this site. I was able to find maps of the colonies from early America and compare them to America today, all on one computer screen.

My favorite history moment using technology was stumbling upon world simulations. Children are now able to assume the role as a character from history, and make decisions using historical information. They are then able to see first hand what their decisions will do to the outcome of today. PBS.org’s Colonial House allows students to be Governor of a New World Colony of Mayne. Using this site, students journey safely across the sea with their selected colonists. They are scored on their decision making skills. I highly suggest giving this a try.

With state testing demands and pressure about student test scores, many districts tend to put social studies/history classes on hold. Students are asked to concentrate on math, science and language arts in preparation for these exams. I believe this does our children a huge disservice. They are our country’s future leaders! Engaging and thought provoking history lessons enable our children to understand society, empathize with others, think globally, make good decisions using problem solving skills, analyze past events to prepare for the future, and most importantly, encourage good citizenship. If our students learn with these engaging technologies and global communication problem based learning methods, I believe our students will be more prepared for the required thinking for desired test scores, but more importantly, they will be capable and confident to succeed as leaders in this ever-changing global society. Technology and history not only make lessons fascinating, they prepare our children for the demands of tomorrow.

Heritage Community Foundation. (2002). Primary Source Overview. Retrieved April 12, 2010, from Heritage Community Foundation Presents Alberta Online Encyclopedia:
http://www.youthsource.ab.ca/teacher_resources/ps_overview.html

NCSS. (1994). Curriculum Standards for Social Studies: I. Introduction. Retrieved April 10, 2010, from National Council for the Social Studies:
http://www.socialstudies.org/standards/introduction