Archive for the ‘STANDARD 1 DESIGN’ Category

My last project for Multimedia EDTECH 513 was to create a worked example, which is a multimedia instruction video.  As I thought about what to create, I kept in mind that I wanted a lesson that I commonly use with my fifth grade students.  Since we became a Google district, I have been encouraging collaboration using the Google Apps.  The most commonly used app is Google Docs.  My students easily get the hang of typing their information because they have had instruction with Microsoft Word in the past.  Sharing documents and saving work is a skill that they commonly have questions about.  With Google Docs it is easy to share and collaborate with partners or groups and the work always saves automatically.  My students constantly need a lesson in the beginning of the year to learn the steps to complete this process.  They usually ask me a few times to review those same steps.  A video on my website demonstrating these steps will help with time management in my classroom because I will not have to reteach the same lessons to students who need new or repetitive instruction.  The students can view a lesson on Google Docs sharing for the initial introduction to the skill with practice, as well as a refresher if any steps were forgotten.  Therefore, I created a worked example demonstrating Google Docs Sharing.

To create this worked example, I had to find screen-recording software that was easy to use for beginners.  I have QuickTime for MAC but I found editing a bit cumbersome.  I downloaded the free trial of Camtasia and was fortunate to find that there were excellent tutorials included with the software.  I watched a few and can’t wait to practice more, but for now I kept it simple.  I used their suggestion and wrote out a script outline for the lesson.  I practiced a few times to learn how to import a title slide, do a voiceover, delete video, and edit any mistakes.  Once I felt comfortable, I created the tutorial in two recordings due to an error towards the middle of my recording.  Basically, I stumbled on the wording and forgot what I was doing.  After I was done, I put the title, title audio and two recordings together to make my worked example and uploaded it to YouTube.  I was sure to keep this week’s reading about conceptually meaningful chunks in mind while recording.  It states that if a procedure has many steps to perform, the lesson should be grouped into skills that build on each other (Clark and Mayer, 2008). To do this, I grouped specific skills and had the students pause the video and practice these skills throughout the lesson to avoid cognitive overload and encourage learning transfer.  Pausing the video allows students to work at their own pace and move forward when they are comfortable completing the next set of skills.  The biggest challenge I faced with recording was finding a quiet space, away from my three sons, ringing phones, computer notifications, and a barking dog.  Aside from that, I found the experience enjoyable and creating worked example videos is something I will continue to do in the future to help my students and train teachers during professional developments that I deliver.  This way all lessons can be revisited if the need arises.  I hope this video tutorial not only helps my students but can also aid teachers of elementary school age children.

Clark, R. C.  & Mayer, R. E. (2008). E-learning and the science of instruction. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

Google Docs Sharing Tutorial Narration

 

Sue’s Digital Story

Posted: August 1, 2016 in STANDARD 1 DESIGN
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In my graduate class, EDTECH 513, I was asked to share a digital story. I chose to discuss my best friend, my sister, who struggled with Juvenile Diabetes and had two kidney transplants.

Here is the link to her digital story.

Here is the link to the transcript.

Enjoy!

Here is the link to the paper I wrote on the Coherence Principle.  Enjoy and feel free to comment.

The Coherence Analysis

Talking EdTech with Trish Podcast link

Podcast Transcript

The podcast series I would create would be a weekly podcast on all different topics about Educational Technology. This week I chose to share as much information about electronic portfolio use in the classroom as I could without overwhelming you. In fact, if anything, I believe I tried to persuade you to think favorably, since electronic portfolios are becoming more and more in demand in school districts. This task was timely because not long ago I was asked by my school district to give a professional development on portfolio use. I was to come up with a plan for a school-wide portfolio assessment program and I really wasn’t confident that I could accomplish it effectively. I studied and reviewed the areas that were hazy to me and as I presented details to you about the digital portfolios, I became reinvested in the practice once again.  As a teacher, I recognize so much potential for the students and fulfillment for the teachers with digital portfolio use.

So now you know my intentions, but here are some of the real comings and goings during this project. I sincerely hope you felt my favorable vibes within the context of my presentation.  The actual preparation of the Podcast was more stressful.  The acoustics weren’t accurate at first, and when that issue was conquered, I jumbled my verbal presentation.  I was feeling very confident at one point, somewhere around providing you with the benefits of student portfolios, when my youngest son barged into the room during recording and I had to start over again. I have three sons, so this interruption was not too bad.  All in all, when I look back at my work, I am proud of the contents.  I am anxious to read what you think and, please tell me, did I sway your opinion of digital portfolio use at all?

 

Haiku DeckThis week, in my EDTECH 513 Multimedia class, we learned that when designing a presentation, it is important to incorporate the Modality Principle. This means that learning occurs through the use of images where only a small amount of text is presented with the narration. For this project, we were asked to use Haiku Deck, which is a website that helps the user create powerful presentations that promote teaching and learning. When I created my account, I experimented with Haiku Deck’s features and I was impressed with how easy it was to navigate and create a presentation with beautiful images and speaker notes.

The presentation I chose to create is titled, Google Edu. My school system just adopted the use of Google Apps for all our students and faculty. At first there was a bit of skepticism on how successful this would be, so I decided to get some training and become a Certified Google Educator. I was able to decide for myself how effective Google Edu is and I would also be able pass on what I learned to my fellow colleagues through Professional Development. After my training, I fell in love with all the Google Apps. I did some PD events but I am still in need of a presentation tool to convince my fellow educators on how cool the Google Apps are and how they can be incorporated into their lesson plans. This presentation will accompany my discussion of an Introduction to the Google Apps. The speaker notes give an outline about what my narration would consist of but I would go into more detail about examples of my use of Google Apps in my classroom.

Here is the link to my presentation: Google Edu

Multimedia & Contiguity Principles Design Notes

This week, I created a Clarify Presentation demonstrating the procedures for creating a digital story using Storyjumper.

The objective is: Given access to storyjumper.com, students will be able to follow procedures in order to create a digital storybook about cyberbullying.

Design notes:

  • Label each step with a title
  • Type “speaker note” style instructions, as if the instructor was speaking to the student.
  • Take screen shots of the storyjumper website that is needed for each step of the procedure.
  • Use minimal text to clarify the speaker notes and explain the graphic.
  • Explain the assessment at the end of the presentation.

I teach STEM in a computer lab; therefore, most of my instruction concentrates on technology procedures. The Multimedia and Contiguity Principle played an important role while designing my presentation.  The layout of the presentation keeps in mind how people learn and how cognitive overload can be an issue when using a great deal of text and graphics.  Consequently, I was certain to maintain graphics as screenshots of the actual procedures of using storyjumper.com.  This was done in order to correctly guide the learner through the process of digital storytelling.  I used transformational graphics that shows a series of steps to keep in mind the Multimedia Principle. The longer instructional text has a simple graphic with short text to simplify the directions.  Words and graphics are recommended for optimal learning. Each step contains only a minimal number of graphics to capture the learner’s attention with words in close proximity to the graphic in order to comply with the Contiguity Principle.  The viewers will gain a clear connection between text and graphic to successfully apply their learning.

Digital Storytelling Instruction Project
AECT standard 1.2 Message Design,

AECT standard 2.3 Computer-Based Technologies

 

I created an introduction to the real world problem of Global Warming as part of my EDTECH 503 class. This class provided the road map of creating an Instructional Design as the designer rather than usual role as a teacher. Any comments are welcome because a valid Instructional Design should always warrant revisions in order to help learners master the content goal.

Global Warming Instructional Design Pages

Technology has become increasingly valuable for educators and students.  When incorporated correctly into the educational setting, our students are able to accomplish set goals more efficiently and productively with the vast array of programs and applications available.  Teachers are able to reach all types of learners and meet the needs of special education students by using assistive technology and programs designed for the challenges of today’s special needs population, as well as regular education students.  According to Roblyer and Doering (2010), the goal of assistive technology is to “harness the potential of technology in ways that offer an individual with a disability increased opportunities for learning, productivity, and independence –opportunities that otherwise would not be available.”  It is important to note that disabilities or special needs include students with physical, cognitive, or sensory disabilities.  This list also includes students with speech recommendations and gifted and talented learners.  I look at every one of my students as special needs, although they may not be classified.  I believe every child has a special and unique way of learning, and technology is able to enhance their success if each lesson is tailored to their learning style and needs.

This week I had the opportunity to visit many sites which described specific assistive technology resources. I clicked around on the Assistive Technology Glogster and was amazed at how many of these unique applications had free downloads and ideas for specific learners. The Universal Design for Living (CAST, 2002-2010) was the most useful in advocating technologies that enhance instruction and support the learner in order for them to be successful and independent.  This website promotes Planning for All Learners (PAL) which “promotes access, participation, and progress in the general education curriculum for all learners” – There is a toolkit that includes tools, resources, guided lessons, models of instruction, and templates in order to facilitate educators when planning to meet the needs of their diverse classroom population.  Teachers must have mentoring and training to keep up with the latest methods of reaching all students, and this website addresses educator’s needs fully.  After reviewing all of the resources available, I questioned some of my own teaching methods, as well.

I recently had a visit from a former student who now follows an IEP for his specific learning disability.  This student struggles with expressive writing and language, as well as difficulty getting thoughts on paper.  The task has always been tedious and frustrating for him, and he was thrilled to tell me that his teacher is allowing him to use the word processor.  This seemed like a fabulous idea for this child since I know the potential of his creative imagination.  I asked him to show me his work when he was finished.  A week later he came to see me, but looked like the same frustrated child I witnessed weeks before.  He muttered under his breath that he “can’t write”.  I asked to see his work and immediately noticed all the points taken off for grammar and spelling.  I was a bit frustrated for him since I knew he had used a word processor.  Why were there so many errors?  Out of pure curiosity, I asked his special education teacher if I could teach him to use the spell and grammar check on the computer thinking this might help his self-esteem.  I respected her answer when she informed me that she didn’t allow that since it would not teach him spelling and grammar.  Perhaps using this icon would be a crutch, however, I wished there was a better way to help this child.  Consequently, his spelling and grammar did not improve from a poor grade.  What next for this child?

After this week’s research, I found a wonderful website that I believe would be beneficial for this student’s needs. I am not a special education teacher; however, I will share this site with our special education team. The program Word Prediction, provides the student with the opportunity to pick from word choices for spelling, and listen to their writing with text to speech ability.  The child can then hear if a word is missing or if the work is not making sense.  The child must pick from a grammar choice, henceforth, will receive a concrete lesson while working.  Unlike spell and grammar check, the program basically tutors the child trough the process.  I could never fault faculty for not being aware of this program.  Schools are not always capable of providing additional professional development when it comes to assistive technology.  Due to budgetary constraints there is the usual visit from vendors and the tendency is to concentrate more on physical disabilities.  I am optimistic that technology training in this area will become more prevalent in the future.

There are enumerable websites and information available about the latest assistive technologies such as, cameras for wheelchairs, text-to-speech applications, switch operated pc mouse, classroom audio enhancements, magnification of computer screens, iPod Touch applications, etc. We were given a wonderful resource in my graduate course called UDL Toolkit Wikispace. This website provides links to all of the wonderful assistive technology advancements.  I suggest visiting this particular site to see if any of these technologies will assist your special learners in order to provide them with an equal educational opportunity as those children in the general education population.  Some of these assistive applications will even help advance at-risk students who could benefit from learning through different means and diverse learning styles.  Keep your students in mind as you browse through each application and technology.  You may be as surprised, as I was, at how you can give each student a new way of learning and opportunity for success.  Please share your thoughts or experiences with me through your comments, since I am also new to the world of assistive technology advancement.

CAST . (2002-2010). Supporting educators in learning about and practicing Universal Design for Learning (UDL) . Retrieved April 20, 2010, from CAST Transforming Education through Universal Design for Living: http://www.cast.org/teachingeverystudent/
Roblyer, M.D., & Doering, A. (2010). Integrating Educational Technology into Teaching. Boston, MA: Pearson Education Inc

Spreadsheet and database software might easily be overlooked as a valuable learning tool in education.  In order to meet the accountability regulations, administrators may quickly provide teachers with access to software for student information, test scores, grade books, student performance data, etc.  Spreadsheets and database programs are beneficial to teachers; however, it is certainly essential that the students be trained to properly use these applications for learning, problem-solving opportunities and the ability to meet today’s technology standards.  For students to achieve success using these technical tools, educators must be fully mindful of the extent that the use of spreadsheet or database applications will realize in helping to improve their students’ learning goals.

What is a Spreadsheet?

A spreadsheet is an electronic worksheet that stores data in rows and columns. An individual cell may contain “numerical values, words or character data, and formulas or calculation commands“. (Roblyer, 2010)  Formulas are used to perform instant numerical operations which make it possible for a student to compare data and explore changes with instant visual results.  Charts and graphs can be supplemented to enhance the organization and evaluation of the work.  The educational advantages of spreadsheets include:

  • Ÿ  Performing numerical operations with visual representation for concrete learning
  • Ÿ  Enhancing a student’s projects with graphs, charts, and data display
  • Ÿ  Encouraging higher level thinking and “what if” problem solving by allowing functions to   complete low level arithmetic
  • Ÿ  Helping students track data from assignments/projects
  • Ÿ  Permitting students to keep track of their grades in order to predict outcomes and     encourage goal setting

What is a Database?

Database software allows users to collect and store information, while providing search engines for easy retrieval of information.  According to Thorsen (2009), databases “provide tools for a skilled user to detect patterns among the facts from which they are built“.  Making predictions, revealing relationships, describing the unknown, making comparisons and effectively problem solving, are just a small number of the capabilities databases provide for our students. Databases should be used to:

  • Ÿ  Help students complete research and look for data among many different organizations
  • Ÿ  Learn invaluable lessons in study skills and organization by relating to the way databases handle information
  • Ÿ  Teach students how data can be organized to show relationships to small pieces of information
  • Ÿ  Question students and encourage them to find information to support their position
  • Ÿ  Practice research skills by locating public databases for analysis

When incorporating spreadsheets and databases into our classrooms, we are empowering students to problem solve and use higher level thinking skills to question, analyze, and explore information.  Students gain an opportunity to use real world tools to gather research and information. As a result, learning becomes more concrete and visual which provides the students with a better understanding of new concepts.  Students become more engaged when they actually see the relevance of their learning and are capable of viewing the results from different perspectives. Students are encouraged to work collaboratively and share information.  These advantages, not only foster the learning process for the student, but the effective use of the technology also provides a sense of accomplishment.

For teachers who are new to Excel and database instruction, internet4classroom.com includes helpful tutorials and resources that can be used by the teacher or your students.  Working together with your student, the use of applications can provide a positive learning experience for both of you.

Thorsen, C. (2009). Techtactics: Technology for teachers (3rd ed.). Boston: Pearson.

Roblyer, M.D., & Doering, A. (2010). Integrating educational technology into teaching. Boston, MA: Pearson Education Inc.

How should technology be used?

This question seems to be the topic of constant conversation in my district today. Many teachers are overwhelmed and are too timid to delve head first into new technology. Others are just as motivated for additional access to more advanced technology as the children. The ISTE lists specific standards for achievement by teachers and students. In order for these standards to be met, administrators must provide technical support in the form of proper continuing education, professional development, district operations, and networking.

When all district technology needs are met, teachers must use the technology for every aspect of teaching, the result of which will be enhanced motivation and engagement of the students. Children today are already using computers, mp3p players, cell phones, digital cameras, Internet, etc. Teachers have the ability to extend a student’s personal use of technology for lessons and research. Students should have a safe environment for applying this new knowledge in digital journals and blogs. Students should communicate with other cultures in order to collaborate and interact with a diverse community of student peers. They should have access to a variety of ways to create multimedia presentations, either individually or collaboratively. Students should have access to programs that will guide them to organize and analyze data for all areas of their curriculum. Computer time is necessary to provide students with the time necessary to research in order to plan and compose their projects. Programs must be available for learners to perform drill and practice exercises to succeed with individual goals. Technology specialists should be available for both students and teachers to in order to troubleshoot hardware or software problems. The specialist will guide students and faculty through the technology learning process and teach safe and responsible technology practices when using the Internet.

Learning is greatly enhanced when technology is responsibly placed in the hands of the students and teachers. The Technology Integrating Matrix provides teachers with wonderful ready-to-use examples on methods for successfully using technology.(Technology, 2009) Fear of the unknown, should not keep us from exploring technology. Teachers today are becoming just as energized and engaged as students about the possibilities that lie ahead in the use of technology. Take the risk of embracing technology. The results are endless and will be surprisingly rewarding for all.

What principles should guide your approach for integrating technology into instruction?

After watching a video on the latest addition to the Apple family, The Apple I Pad, my first instinct was to find out how to get my hands on one and allow my students to use it in my classroom. As tempting as it may be, to incorporate all the “cool” new gadgets on the market, research suggests that I incorporate a direct plan of action before introducing any new technology into my curriculum. Effective technology integration is well planned and works collaboratively with today’s educational curriculum and state standards. Technology is not simply adding gadgets, websites, printouts and spreadsheets into a lesson for your students. Successful technology integration goes beyond the concept of being a “tool “when certain principles and guidelines are practiced before instruction takes place. When developing a unit plan using technology, a teacher must map out a Technology Integration Planning (TIP) Model. This model consists of four phases: (Roblyer, 2007)

• Why should I use a technology based method?
• How will I know students have learned?
• What teaching strategies and actions will work best?
• Are essential conditions in place to support technology integration?

It is important for teacher to insure that a technology lesson meets the criteria for all students in order to succeed. According to the Universal Design for Learning (UDL), every classroom consists of learners with different needs and learning barriers. UDL provides teachers with specific guidelines on methods to use in order to reach all learners. Teachers should provide students with various methods of acquiring information and research. Teachers must keep learners motivated and challenged by keeping lessons interesting and attention-grabbing. Teachers should provide diverse models of ways students can demonstrate what they learned. (CAST,2008) The proper instruction provides all students with a successful opportunity to reach curriculum goals and objectives.

Administration support and training, access to technology tools, and proper technology integration steps, provides every student with a motivating, rewarding and successful opportunity for learning. When all these conditions are met appropriately, our students will be adequately equipped with the 21st century skills required for a successful future.

CAST. (2008). Universal Design for Learning Guidelines Version 1.0. Retrieved February 5, 2010, from Universal Design for Learning Center:

Roblyer, M. D. (2010). Integrating Educational Technology into Teaching (5th Edition). Boston: Pearson Education, Inc. pp. 52-63

Technology, F. C. (2009). The Technology Integration Matrix . Retrieved February 2, 2010, from Florida Center for Instructional Technology: