Worked Example Screencast

Posted: August 8, 2016 in STANDARD 1 DESIGN, STANDARD 3 UTILIZATION
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My last project for Multimedia EDTECH 513 was to create a worked example, which is a multimedia instruction video.  As I thought about what to create, I kept in mind that I wanted a lesson that I commonly use with my fifth grade students.  Since we became a Google district, I have been encouraging collaboration using the Google Apps.  The most commonly used app is Google Docs.  My students easily get the hang of typing their information because they have had instruction with Microsoft Word in the past.  Sharing documents and saving work is a skill that they commonly have questions about.  With Google Docs it is easy to share and collaborate with partners or groups and the work always saves automatically.  My students constantly need a lesson in the beginning of the year to learn the steps to complete this process.  They usually ask me a few times to review those same steps.  A video on my website demonstrating these steps will help with time management in my classroom because I will not have to reteach the same lessons to students who need new or repetitive instruction.  The students can view a lesson on Google Docs sharing for the initial introduction to the skill with practice, as well as a refresher if any steps were forgotten.  Therefore, I created a worked example demonstrating Google Docs Sharing.

To create this worked example, I had to find screen-recording software that was easy to use for beginners.  I have QuickTime for MAC but I found editing a bit cumbersome.  I downloaded the free trial of Camtasia and was fortunate to find that there were excellent tutorials included with the software.  I watched a few and can’t wait to practice more, but for now I kept it simple.  I used their suggestion and wrote out a script outline for the lesson.  I practiced a few times to learn how to import a title slide, do a voiceover, delete video, and edit any mistakes.  Once I felt comfortable, I created the tutorial in two recordings due to an error towards the middle of my recording.  Basically, I stumbled on the wording and forgot what I was doing.  After I was done, I put the title, title audio and two recordings together to make my worked example and uploaded it to YouTube.  I was sure to keep this week’s reading about conceptually meaningful chunks in mind while recording.  It states that if a procedure has many steps to perform, the lesson should be grouped into skills that build on each other (Clark and Mayer, 2008). To do this, I grouped specific skills and had the students pause the video and practice these skills throughout the lesson to avoid cognitive overload and encourage learning transfer.  Pausing the video allows students to work at their own pace and move forward when they are comfortable completing the next set of skills.  The biggest challenge I faced with recording was finding a quiet space, away from my three sons, ringing phones, computer notifications, and a barking dog.  Aside from that, I found the experience enjoyable and creating worked example videos is something I will continue to do in the future to help my students and train teachers during professional developments that I deliver.  This way all lessons can be revisited if the need arises.  I hope this video tutorial not only helps my students but can also aid teachers of elementary school age children.

Clark, R. C.  & Mayer, R. E. (2008). E-learning and the science of instruction. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

Google Docs Sharing Tutorial Narration

 

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